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Tag Archives: tzitzit

Korah — Numbers 16:1 – 18:32

During a brief visit to Dublin, the birthplace of Oscar Wilde (October 16, 1854), I was struck by the author, playwright, and poet’s quick wit and keen observations about human nature. Wilde once quipped that, “Arguments are extremely vulgar, for everyone in good society holds exactly the same opinion.” Torah, on the other hand, teaches […] http://bethsholomsf.org/korah-numbers-161-1832-3/ Continue Reading...

Va’et’hanan — Deuteronomy 3:23 – 7:11

How does empathy resonate with you? American astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson once remarked that, “Humans aren’t as good as we should be in our capacity to empathize with feelings and thoughts of others, be they humans or other animals on Earth. So maybe part of our formal education should be training in empathy. Imagine how […] http://bethsholomsf.org/vaethanan-deuteronomy-323-711-2/ Continue Reading...

Korah — Numbers 16:1 – 18:32

During a brief visit to Dublin, the birthplace of Oscar Wilde (October 16, 1854), I was struck by the author, playwright, and poet’s quick wit and keen observations about human nature. Wilde once quipped that, “Arguments are extremely vulgar, for everyone in good society holds exactly the same opinion.” Torah, on the other hand, teaches […] http://bethsholomsf.org/korah-numbers-161-1832-2/ Continue Reading...

Shelach Lecha — Numbers 13:1 – 15:41

“Even if you’re not doing anything wrong, you are being watched and recorded.” This remark by Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency (NSA) subcontractor who made headlines in 2013 when he leaked top secret information about NSA surveillance activities, is indeed curious – and it has theological implications. In a wired, connected world in […] http://bethsholomsf.org/shelach-lecha-numbers-131-1541/ Continue Reading...

Va’et’hanan — Deuteronomy 3:23 – 7:11

What is empathy to you? German philosopher Theodor Lipps (1851–1914) often reflected on the quality of empathy, or Einfühlung, seeing it as a key to understanding our aesthetic experiences as well as the primary basis for recognizing each other as thinking, acting creatures. Lipps contends that empathy explains the felt immediacy of our aesthetic appreciation […] http://bethsholomsf.org/vaethanan-deuteronomy-323-711/ Continue Reading...